Do You Have A Story To Share?

We are excellent listeners.

Small Stones publishes diverse first-person narratives related to education, civic-minded action, resistance, and anything else fascinating that falls into our laps. You can download a description of our interview process here.

Our guiding beliefs and goals for these interviews are:


  • History is personal as well as factual. Facts and statistics are part of history, but so, too, is personal experience—otherwise known as ‘your story’ or ‘oral history.’ First-person stories are humanizing because we all have them, whether we’re famous or not.
  • Stories can be transformational. People learn about themselves and the human condition by sharing, reading, and hearing stories. They also foster connection with others. We aim to to foster a sense of agency in our narrators and ourselves via storytelling.
  • Oral history is an opportunity to honor a person. We aim to be respectful, trustworthy, and accurate as we listen to and share our narrators’ stories.

Our standard process is to record, transcribe, and edit the interview cooperatively with you. However, you remain in control: you can call off the process at any time; you can edit the interview; and we’re happy to publish the interview anonymously if that makes sense for you.

Read more about our interview process hereIf you’re interested in telling your story, please email us to discuss: Or reach out on Twitter. We’re at @smallstonesedu.

Small Stones Interviews: Eze Amos, Photographer

“…and then some of them took a knee and got out their gas masks, and at this point I was telling some of the policemen, ‘This is not necessary! What are you doing?'”

Here at Small Stones, we define education, and educators, broadly. So often, classrooms appear in the most unexpected places.

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Resist! Protesting the Ku Klux Klan. Photo by Eze Amos.

As we continue our own work of interviewing some of these educators, we wanted to share with you work from a friend of the blog. Photographer and photojournalist Eze Amos, a Charlottesville, Virginia local, has found himself in the middle of some of the larger protests and counter protests that have taken place since the 2016 election. We are featuring some of his images in this post; there are far more on his Instagram feed.

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Resist! Protesting the Ku Klux Klan. Photo by Eze Amos.

The issue at hand? A statue of Robert E. Lee, erected in 1924, that the city voted to remove earlier this year. The removal, however, is being held up by legal challenges. In May, white supremacist groups marched on the city carrying torches. This past Saturday, July 8, the KKK arrived. Continue reading “Small Stones Interviews: Eze Amos, Photographer”

Weekend Reading


First in our reading list is, appropriately, a summer reading list, via Public Books. It’s curated by their section editors, and covers topics from Global Black History to Literary Fiction to Comics. Our library lists just expanded from reasonable to out-of-control…here are a few we’re really excited about:

School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex and Christian Robinson (Roaring Brook). This warm, witty, and inclusive picture book filters first-day-of-school jitters through the perspective of the school itself, giving young readers a new outlook on a familiar place…

In Gratitude by Jenny Diski (Bloomsbury). Part of it is mourning: those of us who read everything Diski wrote read this memoir-of-dying as a goodbye to an essential habit. Part of it is the pleasure Diski always gave: seemingly familiar stories told by dispensing with any of the usual reference points, like some sort of trick of the light making you step gingerly into a room you thought you knew…

Underground Airlines by Ben Winters (Mulholland). In the spirit of Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle, this account of slavery still ongoing in 2016 America asks readers to notice how much (or how little) has actually changed in our own world of racial profiling and third-world factory production…

Public Library: And Other Stories by Ali Smith (Anchor). Smith’s latest collection looks uncannily like the bookshelf of a library: you don’t know what you’ll find next to what, but you do trust that some logic governs the juxtapositions.  The lyrical statistics and laconic anecdotes that caulk together Smith’s stories add up to a story of their own, about the neoliberal British state replacing librarians by volunteers and selling off reading rooms to private fitness clubs.  The collection ends with Smith’s partner going through her dead mother’s purse to dispose of credit cards, reward cards, driver’s license: “The one thing I couldn’t bring myself to throw away was her library card.”

Next week’s interview is with an Episcopal priest working in interfaith education out of Chicago. If you’d like to get a quick preview of what we’ll be discussing, check out this quick read from Daily Kos about the contemporary Sanctuary Movement:

A month after popular vote loser Donald Trump’s election, some 450 houses of worship nationwide pledged to become sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants, with one church in the Los Angeles area calling for “holy resistance” to his mass deportation force. And houses of worship have heeded the call, with the number of congregations vowing to protect immigrants from ICE doubling to 800, according to a new report from 60 Minutes. Undocumented parents like Jeanette Vizguerra—recently named one of Time’s 100 most influential people—have fled to churches for safety and as a last recourse.

And in honor of our first Small Stones Interview, we want to finish up by highlighting LaQuisha Beckum’s non-profit, Generation Reformation, and some of its programs. Check them out, and get in touch with the organization if you are local, have question, or even have services to offer! They are particularly looking for funding to complete the Generation Reformation organization site, which you can find here. The Facebook page is here. One of their projects is an after-school program that you can check out here.

Small Stones Interviews: Coming Soon!


We are still here! And despite what our posting schedule might indicate, we’ve been hard at work–when not drowning in the news cycle.

Next week we will bring you the first installment in a series of educator interviews. Part of what we hope to do with this space is feature voices of the people who continue to, for lack of a better way of putting it, work their asses off to make sure that the future of our civic society is better than the present. We’ve been talking with classroom teachers; we’ve also been talking with people whose education work is a little less traditional. All of them, we feel, have an important angle on what it means to educate in this moment, in this country.

It’s not too late to share your story! If you’re interested in having a conversation with us that could be featured here, get in touch. We’re excited to share the organizations and programs our teachers are working with, but we are very open to anonymous interviews as well.

Check back soon. We think you’ll be as fascinated as we have been to hear what these educators are doing.